News

 National News

National Commander Presents Awards to Top Air Force Academy Cadets
Mon, 21 May 2018 15:00:23 -0500

Maj. Gen. Mark Smith, Civil Air Patrol's national commander/CEO and himself an Air Force Academy graduate, presented a pair of CAP-sponsored awards to graduating cadets from the class of 2018 today at the end of the academy's academic year.

Smith presented:

  • Cadet 1st Class Ben Hook with an award recognizing  the top scholastic rating among graduating cadets who are current or former CAP members. Hook is a former cadet member of the Colorado Wing's Air Academy Cadet Squadron and he received CAP's top cadet honor, the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award, in February 2014.
     
  • The Outstanding Cadet in Military Strategic Studies Award to Cadet 1st Class Riley Murray during the academy's Departmental Award Ceremony.

"I am proud to represent Civil Air Patrol in honoring these two fine cadets for excellence in performance here at the Air Force Academy," Smith said. "The significance of the honor they're receiving is especially meaningful to me as an Academy graduate."

Historic CAP Painting Bound for Pentagon Via 11-Wing Relay
Thu, 17 May 2018 14:24:23 -0500

Total Force Partners,” a historic Civil Air Patrol painting by renowned aviation artist Rick Broome, is leaving Colorado Springs on Saturday morning on a 1,638-mile, 11-wing trek through the nation’s heartland to its final destination at the Pentagon.

The CAP van relay begins at 7 a.m. MT on May 19 and will end at 11 a.m. ET on May 25. Most of the trip will be made along Interstate 70, one of the nation’s longest cross-country routes. The route can be followed online.

“This wing-by-wing painting relay provides a fun and interesting opportunity to promote CAP’s brand,” said John Salvador, the organization’s chief operating officer.

To add a new twist, the painting relay, which includes the Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and National Capital wings, plus Civil Air Patrol’s Congressional Squadron, will take place the week before CAP’s 70th anniversary as the volunteer auxiliary of the Air Force.

Broome, a former CAP cadet from Colorado, was commissioned to create the commemorative painting in 2016 as part of CAP’s 75th anniversary celebration. It was scheduled to be presented to then-Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein during the 2016 Air Force Association Air, Space & Cyber Conference. However, the painting was damaged in transit to National Harbor, Maryland, forcing CAP to present a print of the painting for temporary display in the Pentagon.

Last month, Broome completed a second painting of “Total Force Partners,” which again features a CAP Cessna 182 being intercepted by an Air Force F-16 during a U.S. air defense training exercise.

“This is really an incredible work of art,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Smith, CAP’s national commander and CEO. “We’re proud of our partnership with the U.S. Air Force, and this painting wonderfully depicts the importance of homeland security missions we perform as the Air Force auxiliary.”

Congress passed Public Law 80-557 in 1948, and President Harry S. Truman signed it into law on May 26, formally establishing CAP as the volunteer auxiliary of the Air Force. Before that, CAP had served in support of the Army Air Corps; the new law ensured the partnership would continue with the newly formed Air Force.

“That relationship with the Air Force continues today, and it is stronger than ever,” said Smith, an Operation Desert Storm veteran with 26 years of Air Force service.

He added that the new original painting, after it arrives in the nation’s capital on May 25, will replace the print currently on display in the Pentagon.

 Wing News

National Commander Presents Awards to Top Air Force Academy Cadets
Mon, 21 May 2018 15:00:23 -0500

Maj. Gen. Mark Smith, Civil Air Patrol's national commander/CEO and himself an Air Force Academy graduate, presented a pair of CAP-sponsored awards to graduating cadets from the class of 2018 today at the end of the academy's academic year.

Smith presented:

  • Cadet 1st Class Ben Hook with an award recognizing  the top scholastic rating among graduating cadets who are current or former CAP members. Hook is a former cadet member of the Colorado Wing's Air Academy Cadet Squadron and he received CAP's top cadet honor, the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award, in February 2014.
     
  • The Outstanding Cadet in Military Strategic Studies Award to Cadet 1st Class Riley Murray during the academy's Departmental Award Ceremony.

"I am proud to represent Civil Air Patrol in honoring these two fine cadets for excellence in performance here at the Air Force Academy," Smith said. "The significance of the honor they're receiving is especially meaningful to me as an Academy graduate."

Historic CAP Painting Bound for Pentagon Via 11-Wing Relay
Thu, 17 May 2018 14:24:23 -0500

Total Force Partners,” a historic Civil Air Patrol painting by renowned aviation artist Rick Broome, is leaving Colorado Springs on Saturday morning on a 1,638-mile, 11-wing trek through the nation’s heartland to its final destination at the Pentagon.

The CAP van relay begins at 7 a.m. MT on May 19 and will end at 11 a.m. ET on May 25. Most of the trip will be made along Interstate 70, one of the nation’s longest cross-country routes. The route can be followed online.

“This wing-by-wing painting relay provides a fun and interesting opportunity to promote CAP’s brand,” said John Salvador, the organization’s chief operating officer.

To add a new twist, the painting relay, which includes the Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and National Capital wings, plus Civil Air Patrol’s Congressional Squadron, will take place the week before CAP’s 70th anniversary as the volunteer auxiliary of the Air Force.

Broome, a former CAP cadet from Colorado, was commissioned to create the commemorative painting in 2016 as part of CAP’s 75th anniversary celebration. It was scheduled to be presented to then-Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein during the 2016 Air Force Association Air, Space & Cyber Conference. However, the painting was damaged in transit to National Harbor, Maryland, forcing CAP to present a print of the painting for temporary display in the Pentagon.

Last month, Broome completed a second painting of “Total Force Partners,” which again features a CAP Cessna 182 being intercepted by an Air Force F-16 during a U.S. air defense training exercise.

“This is really an incredible work of art,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Smith, CAP’s national commander and CEO. “We’re proud of our partnership with the U.S. Air Force, and this painting wonderfully depicts the importance of homeland security missions we perform as the Air Force auxiliary.”

Congress passed Public Law 80-557 in 1948, and President Harry S. Truman signed it into law on May 26, formally establishing CAP as the volunteer auxiliary of the Air Force. Before that, CAP had served in support of the Army Air Corps; the new law ensured the partnership would continue with the newly formed Air Force.

“That relationship with the Air Force continues today, and it is stronger than ever,” said Smith, an Operation Desert Storm veteran with 26 years of Air Force service.

He added that the new original painting, after it arrives in the nation’s capital on May 25, will replace the print currently on display in the Pentagon.

National Commander Visits Green Flag-West
Tue, 15 May 2018 13:50:25 -0500

Maj Gen Mark Smith, Civil Air Patrol national commander, visited one of CAP’s major programs in support of the U.S. Air Force, Army and Marines -- Operation Green Flag-West at North Las Vegas Airport in Nevada – on May 10.

As part of both Green Flag-West and, in Louisiana, Green Flag-East, a sensor ball camera is placed on the belly or beneath the wing of a CAP Cessna, turning that airplane into a “Surrogate Reaper.” This enables the CAP airplane, once aloft, to mimic the Air Force’s MQ-1 Predator or MQ-9 Reaper – unmanned aircraft, depending on the focus of the training exercise, while providing real-time data and imagery to U.S. service members on the ground.

The sensor ball camera allows the Cessna’s CAP aircrew to lock onto a target and track it in real-time using full-motion video. Military service members on the ground are able to train before deployment overseas without having to rely on an actual Predator or Reaper for that purpose, thus enabling maximum usage of available Predators and Reapers for missions of national defense overseas rather than for training purposes stateside.

During his visit, Smith spoke with Air Force and CAP participants alike about the importance of the Surrogate Reaper program and the significant contributions to national security provided by their Surrogate Reaper training support to U.S. military forces.

Cadet Experience Leads to a Career as Aircraft Maintenance Technician
Wed, 09 May 2018 17:17:43 -0500

Sheila Pursglove
Contributing Writer

Kristen Blue first learned about Civil Air Patrol at an eighth-grade open house. Thanks to her love of the outdoors and camping, she was immediately drawn to the organization’s search and rescue mission.

Five years as a cadet led her to pursue a career in aviation. She’s now an aircraft maintenance technician at Boshart Enterprises & Aircraft Services Inc. in Batavia, New York.

“Without Civil Air Patrol I may have never been introduced to the world of general aviation,” she said. “I absolutely credit CAP with leading me to my aviation career.”

Boshart, which has had a working relationship with CAP for many years as a logistics vendor and sponsor, is a Federal Aviation Administration-certified repair station and has been servicing general aviation aircraft for over 30 years. Authorized to provide major airframe and engine repairs, engine installations and certified modifications, as well as general maintenance, Boshart also operates a full-service, state-of-the art avionics shop.

The Boshart team works on a variety of general aviation aircraft, including a lot of Pipers, Cessnas and Cirrus aircraft.

“So far my favorite aircraft I’ve worked on is a 1946 Widgeon seaplane,” Blue said. “I do occasionally see Civil Air Patrol planes come into the hangar, and I get very excited because it reminds me of why I got into aviation in the first place — and now I get to make sure these aircraft are safe for the flights of other aviation enthusiasts.

“I’m still learning, so sometimes I shadow with a more experienced employee,” she added. “I love working for Boshart. They’re so experienced and helpful when I have questions. We do inspections on airplanes, fix any problems we find, run and taxi them, and make sure everything is safe for the airplane to fly.

“My favorite part of the job is the unpredictability and always doing something different. You really never know what’s going to land at your airport or who you’re going to meet on any given day.”

“We’re thrilled to have Kristen on our team — she’s enthusiastic, hard-working and responsible,” said Carol Boshart, the company’s vice president. “There’s no doubt the CAP cadet program inspires in youth a love of aviation.”

Blue got a taste of her future career during high school through a full-day job shadow and a weeklong internship at Boshart through a BOCES (Boards of Cooperative Educational Services) program; which allowed her to earn college credit before graduation. “I really enjoyed my time interning there; everyone was so kind and helpful, and it really helped me decide for sure that I wanted to go to college for aviation,” she said.

 

Blue’s favorite classes during her yearlong course at Mohawk Valley Community College were physics and welding. The strict curriculum set by the FAA included a specific hour requirement for each subject, and it was structured like a standard work week – eight hours a day, five days a week.

“It was interesting going to school at an airport and seeing different planes every day,” Blue said. “We sometimes had fighter jets fly over, and everyone would run to the window or outside to see them.” 

As a New York Wing cadet, Blue served with the Condor Composite Squadron, based at Perry-Warsaw Airport.

“I enjoyed the flying, but search and rescue training was probably my overall favorite activity,” said Blue, who qualified as a ground team member.

“I also always looked forward to the New York Wing Conference, staying in a hotel with my cadet friends and dressing up for the dance at the end of the weekend. And I enjoyed leading my squadron during my time as squadron cadet commander.” Honored as Cadet of the Year for the New York Wing’s Finger Lakes Group, Blue also received the Presidential Volunteer Service Award and the Mike Rowe Work Ethic Scholarship and was named American Legion Walter Klein Post No. 532 Humanitarian of the Year.

“I was so proud of winning the awards but even more proud of how close it brought me to my mentors in the CAP program,” she said. “It was a great honor.”

In 2015, she attended National Blue Beret in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, a two-week summertime CAP National Cadet Special Activities event that provides participants with the opportunity to work at one of the largest and most prestigious air shows in the world.

“I enjoyed every aspect of NBB,” she said. “I made so many friends that I still talk to all the time. Getting a behind-the-scenes look at one of the largest air shows was unforgettable. I want to go back!”

Blue, who has some flight time in gliders but has not yet soloed, plans to start powered flight training as soon as she is able. “Getting my pilot license is a dream of mine,” she said. “I want to fly, and working with planes every day only makes me want it more.”

A native of Pavilion, New York, who now makes her home in the Rochester suburb of Brockport, Blue plans to rejoin CAP soon, as a senior member. “I’m looking forward to more responsibility and more opportunities in emergency services and search and rescue,” she said. “I’m also excited for all the new friendships it will bring.”

 
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